Parent Tips

Q&A with Peggy Kaye, HOMER’s Chief Curriculum Officer

Many children feel that unless they read with the fluency of adults, then they are bad readers. Other children see classmates having an easier time learning to read and it makes them insecure. Children rarely accept the “everyone learns at a different pace” line — although it’s the truth. They don’t accept analogies like baseball players need a lot of practice before they are master athletes.

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Q&A with Peggy Kaye, HOMER’s Chief Curriculum Officer

No one knows more about children’s books than librarians who work in the children’s room of a library. The librarian at your child’s school is an equally valuable resource. There are also bookstores with excellent children’s departments and very knowledgeable clerks.

Before talking to any of these people, I recommend making a list of books your child has particularly enjoyed and consider what kinds of books are the most appealing: books about kids like them, books about magical worlds, books with lots of action, books with lots of silliness. This will help you to select stories that your child will be more interested in reading.

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Q&A with Peggy Kaye, HOMER’s Chief Curriculum Officer

Children who love books and stories before they are readers are very likely to love reading.  Children who get lost in stories they hear, who imagine characters and feel for the problems characters face, are likely to also get lost in stories as they start reading. Being swept away to other worlds as you listen to stories is the path to being swept away to other words as you read for yourself.

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It’s that time of year again – when kids trade in swimsuits for backpacks, and the smell of freshly sharpened pencils fill the air. New school years comes with new beginnings…and new emotions, often with a mix of anxiousness, excitement, and anticipation around every detail – even the first day outfit!

Your child’s unique personality is reflected in their style, and it’s important for children to take ownership of what they wear, but that doesn’t mean you have to let them out of the house in shorts on a chilly day.

Here’s how you can navigate the wardrobe woes to foster self expression while also being school and weather appropriate:

Let Them Choose

Little ones can feel less in control when everything is decided for them. Instead of giving your 3- or 4-year-old free reign of the closet, pre-select two appropriate outfits. Then, let your child choose between them. And if your budding fashion designer mixes styles from the outfits, so be it. A mismatched look isn’t the end of the world!

Then Choose Your Battles

What if your child wants to wear a dress…Every. Single. Day? If you’re concerned about cooler weather, warm tights and layered cardigans will do the trick. And if you’re worried about comfort, choose soft fabrics and breathable knits.

And Always Accessorize

Let personalities shine through the details. For kids who love jewelry, try beaded bracelets or an engraved necklace. Hairstyles, headbands, and even a streak of vibrant hair color are easy ways for kids to personalize their look. And unexpected touches, like bold patterned socks, can really make them smile 😄

KIDBOX makes it easy, fun, and affordable to shop for children’s clothes. Every season you’ll get a box of clothes from brands like Puma, Jessica Simpson, 7 For All Mankind, Splendid, Vintage Havana and more, specifically picked for your child’s style and delivered to your door.

The best part? As a HOMER member, you’ll get 15% off your first full* KIDBOX – visit KIDBOX.com today and enter the promo code “HOMER” at checkout. For every full box you keep, you’ll get to donate an item of clothing to a child in need.

*You must keep all items in your KIDBOX order to receive the 15% discount.

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As you embark on your springtime activities, you may find yourself in the car once or twice. One of our amazing HOMER moms, Crissy Goldman, from Ventura, California, shares a springtime game that would be perfect to play en route to outdoor play places and anywhere in-between. The great news about this game is that you can refer to topics your child learns about in HOMER’s Discover the World section.   

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